Improving drivers' risk management behaviour: an assault on speeding

Research from the aviation industry has demonstrated that a cognitive training method, termed episodic training, can improve pilots' risk management in a simulated environment. Drawing from this research, experiment 1 aimed to investigate whether episodic training could produce similar improvements in motorists' risk management behaviour, namely in the area of speeding. The results revealed that episodic training was an effective method to reduce young novice drivers' tendency to speed in a simulated driving environment.

Creator
Prasannah Prabhakharan
Supervisor
Brett Molesworth
Level
PhD
Man driving

Improving Young Novice Drivers' Speed Management Behaviour

Road related fatalities are a global problem. In New South Wales, Australia, excess speed is thought to be one of the leading contributing factors for fatal motor vehicle crashes. Speed management remains an elusive skill for many young drivers. Using lessons learnt from aviation and road domains in Australia, the present research aimed to develop a new practical approach to improve young drivers' speed management behaviour.

Creator
Dr Oleksandra Krasnova
Supervisor
Dr Brett Molesworth
Level
PhD
Car dashboard at night

An Investigation Into Human Factors Influencing Driver Behaviour and Traffic Law Enforcement in Jordan

This dissertation investigates the human factors influencing driver behaviour and traffic law enforcement in Jordan. The research was carried out using two separate survey studies that aimed to determine the factors that are significantly associated with receiving traffic fines and being involved in crashes and to investigate the perceptions of drivers and traffic Police concerning traffic law enforcement and driver behaviour. A total of 501 drivers and 180 Police officers were surveyed.

Creator
Faisal Magableh
Supervisor
Raphael Grzebieta
Level
PhD
Truck